Welcome

Welcome to the Summer 2013 edition of the Innovation Review.There have been several changes at the New York State Science & Technology Law Center in the past few months. Sadly, Professor Ted Hagelin, director of the NYS STLC, passed away mid-May from an aggressive form of cancer. While no one can… Read More»

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Remembering Professor Ted Hagelin

Professor Ted Hagelin, founder and Director of the Technology Commercialization Law Program at Syracuse University College of Law; Director of the New York State Science and Technology Law Center; Crandall Melvin Professor of Law; and Kauffman Professor of Entrepreneurship and Innovation, passed away Saturday, May 18, 2013.Professor Hagelin was an… Read More»

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Resource Spotlight: The US Commercial Service

The U.S. Commercial Service, a division of the U.S. Department of Commerce, offers a number of services to companies who export or are considering exporting to markets all over the world. Choosing a new market is complicated and best determined with relevant information about the size of the market, the business and… Read More»

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Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc.

Supreme Court Case involving: patents, DNA, medical industryBackground: A research firm that engages in genetic interpretation, Myriad Genetics, Inc., obtained patents on two “isolated” forms of genes. These genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are known to have mutations that suggest a higher risk of breast and ovarian cancer in women. In order to analyze… Read More»

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Bowman v. Monsanto Co.

Supreme Court Case involving: patents, bioengineering, biotechnology, agriculture industryBackground: Farmers who buy seeds from Monsanto, such as the soybeans containing the Roundup Ready gene which makes plants immune to the herbicide Roundup, must sign an agreement with the company not to save the seeds. This ensures that farmers who want… Read More»

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Mutual Pharmaceutical Co. v. Bartlett

Supreme Court Case involving: pharmaceuticals, FDA regulation, medical industryBackground: In 2004, a New Hampshire woman, Karen Bartlett, took Mutual Pharmaceutical Co.’s generic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, sulindac. Bartlett suffered a known, but rare, skin hypersensitivity reaction. It was extremely severe and ultimately left here severely disfigured as two-thirds of her body was covered in… Read More»

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